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FYI Number 46: April 12, 2001

NSF FY 2002 Request: Physics and Materials Research

NSF's "FY 2002 Budget Request to Congress" details the Physics and Materials Research requests:

PHYSICS SUBACTIVITY:

The Physics Subactivity request would decline 2.1%, or $3.96 million, from $187.53 million to $183.57 million.

Within this Subactivity, the Physics Research budget would decline 5.3%, or $6.93 million, from $131.65 million to $124.72 million. The budget document states: "Through the redirection of existing funds, we will provide enhanced support for Physics Frontiers Centers, a program begun in FY 2001 to provide critical resources and needed infrastructure to exceptionally promising new areas of physics. Lower priority research areas will be reduced. Support for the Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, a Science and Technology Center (STC), terminates following the normal STC sunset schedule. Support of forefront areas of physics, with some emphasis on particle and nuclear astrophysics, atom-level manipulation, quantum information science, biological physics and advanced R&D towards next generation particle accelerators and gravitational wave detectors will continue. Education and outreach activities will receive continued emphasis: enhancing K-12 science teacher training, integrating research and education, and broadening the role physics plays in new and emerging areas of research, including the training of young physicists."

Also within this Subactivity, the Facilities budget would increase 5.3%, or $2.97 million, from $55.88 million to $58.85 million. The budget document states: "This increase corresponds to (1) an increase in the operating budget to make effective use of Michigan State University's National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's radioactive ion beam upgrade project; (2) increased operating support for LIGO as the detector moves towards full operations and the first coincidence observations between LIGO's two detector sites; and (3) a reduction of support for the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility corresponding to partial support in the final year of operations of that facility. Funding for the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) operations will remain at $19.50 million."

MATERIALS RESEARCH

The Materials Research (DMR) Subactivity request would decline 2.1%, or $4.33 million, from $209.75 million to $205.42 million.

Within this Subactivity, the Materials Research budget would decline 4.9%, or $8.83 million, from $179.51 million to $170.68 million. The budget document states: "New activities will emphasize nanoscale structures and quantum control and biosystems at the nanoscale; computational materials science; and the interface between biological systems and materials. DMR will support new activities integrating materials research and education, including activities to foster enhanced international cooperation in materials and initiate an electronic Materials World Net. DMR will also increase support for young scientists and engineers in the materials field, and respond to diverse human resource development needs for the future workforce in advanced materials. In order to support these new activities the number of existing materials research projects will be reduced following competitive review."

In addition, "In FY 2002, up to three new Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers will be established through open competition in critical areas such as nanoscale science and engineering, information technology, and the interface between materials and biology. One International Materials Institute will be established to foster and enhance interaction in materials research and education between U.S. and foreign investigators. Support for existing Centers will be reduced through competitive review. Support for Materials Research Centers decreases by $3.31 million to $54.25 million."

Also within this subactivity, the Facilities budget would increase 14.9%, or $4.50 million, from $30.24 million to $34.74 million. The budget document states: "This support includes strengthening user programs and facilities at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), enabling it to properly maintain and upgrade its unique set of continuous and pulsed-field magnets for users across a wide range of disciplines. DMR will also provide $1.0 million to support enhanced capabilities at the Center for High Resolution Neutron Scattering at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and at the Synchrotron Radiation Center at the University of Wisconsin."

"FY 2002 will be the last year of DMR's supported design and development activities at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory."

Richard M. Jones
Media and Government Relations Division
American Institute of Physics
fyi@aip.org
(301) 209-3095

 

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