FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News

FY 2010 USGS Appropriations Bill

Richard M. Jones
Number 130 - November 2, 2009  |  Search FYI  |   FYI Archives  |   Subscribe to FYI

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The FY 2010 Interior, Environment Appropriations Bill has been sent to President Barack Obama for his signature. Contained within H.R. 2996 is funding for the U.S. Geological Survey. Total funding for USGS increases 6.5 percent in FY 2010.

This bill also contains a provision to continue funding at current levels for departments and agencies for which an appropriations bill has not been passed. This funding expires on December 18. Seven of the twelve appropriations bills have not yet been passed. No one is predicting the number of these bills that will be passed separately, since the upcoming debate on health care reform is expected to consume almost all floor time. Bills that are not passed will be combined into a single bill.

The full conference report, House Report 111-316, has not yet been published in final form. However, it is available in the Congressional Record.

Total USGS:

The FY 2009 USGS appropriation was $1,043.8 million
The FY 2010 request was $1,097.8 million, an increase of $54.0 million or 5.2 percent.

The final bill provides $1,111.7 million, an increase of 6.5 percent or $67.9 million.

There are eight components of the USGS budget. The conference report, in language applying to all USGS components, states: “In addition to the guidance included in both the House and Senate committee reports the conference agreement provides the following direction.” This new language is shown below. View the House report language and the Senate report language.

Geographic Research, Investigations, and Remote Sensing:

The FY 2009 appropriation was $142.1 million
The FY 2010 request was $143.9 million, an increase of $1.8 million or 1.3 percent.

The final bill provides $145.6 million, an increase of 2.4 percent or $3.5 million.

The conference report states:

“The conference agreement includes the House proposed bill language and direction concerning the Civil Applications Committee, and provides $1,650,000 above the budget request for its operation.”

Geological Hazards, Resources, and Processes:

The FY 2009 appropriation was $242.1 million.
The FY 2010 request was $247.0 million, an increase of $4.9 million or 2.0 percent.

The final bill provides $249.1 million, an increase of 2.9 percent or $7.0 million.

The conference report states:

“The conference agreement includes the following increases to the request: $1,000,000 for LIDAR and high risk seismology activities and $250,000 for the Global Seismographic Network as proposed by the House; and $250,000 for the UH-Manoa/HVO volcano research/
monitoring partnership in Hawaii as proposed by the Senate.

“Geologic Resource Assessments.--The conference agreement includes the Senate proposed increase of $650,000 to continue the Nye County minerals assessment project, NV.”


Water Resources Investigations:

The FY 2009 appropriation was $221.4 million.
The FY 2010 request was $227.9 million, an increase of $6.5 million or 2.9 percent.

The final bill provides $232.3 million, an increase of 4.9 percent or $10.9 million.

The conference report states:

“Ground Water Resources.--The conference agreement includes the following increases to the request: $300,000 for the South Arkansas Sparta Aquifer Recovery Initiative and $280,000 for the McHenry County groundwater and storm water protection study as proposed by the House; and $900,000 to continue the San Diego Formation mapping project as proposed by the Senate.

“Hydrologic Research and Development.--The conference agreement includes the following increases to the request: $1,000,000 for the U.S.-Mexico Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Program; $200,000 for the Hood Canal Dissolved Oxygen Study, WA; and $400,000 for the Survey's participation in the work of the Long Term Estuary Assessment Group, LA.

“Hydrologic Networks and Analysis.--The conference agreement includes the following increases to the request, as proposed by the Senate: $346,000 for Lake Champlain Basin streamflow monitoring/toxic studies; $500,000 for a water resources assessment of Maryland's Coastal Plain and Piedmont aquifer systems; and $500,000 for water resources monitoring, investigations and research in Hawaii. The Survey is encouraged to consider maintaining its activities at the San Pedro River Basin, AZ, as authorized by section 321 of Public Law 108-136.”

Biological Research:

The FY 2009 appropriation was $185.3 million.
The FY 2010 request was $199.3 million, an increase of $13.9 million or 7.5 percent.

The final bill provides $204.9 million, an increase of 10.6 percent or $19.6 million.

The conference report states:

“The conference agreement includes the following increases to the request: $220,000 for the Conte Anadromous Fish Research Lab, MA; $1,000,000 for San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds restoration monitoring/research; $750,000 for general genetics and genomic research; $600,000 for tropical ecosystems and watershed health research; $2,000,000 within biological information management and delivery to support the coordinators of the national network of State conservation data agencies; $750,000 for National Biological Information Infrastructure activities; and $350,000 for the design and testing of monitoring protocols on invasive species, including zebra mussels, in the Columbia River Basin in collaboration with Washington State University and its partners. The Survey is encouraged to conduct further research and analyses regarding the alarming interaction of endocrine disrupters on water quality and fish development.”

Enterprise Information:

The FY 2009 appropriation was $42.7 million.
The FY 2010 request was $46.0 million, an increase of 7.7 percent or $3.3 million.

The final bill provides $46.0 million, an increase of 7.7 percent or $3.3 million.

The conference report states:

“The conference agreement includes the $2,000,000 requested for USGS participation in the Department of the Interior's 21st Century Youth Conservation Corps initiative.”

Global Change:

The FY 2009 appropriation was $40.6 million.
The FY 2010 request was $58.2 million, an increase of 43.3 percent or $17.6 million.

The final bill provides $58.2 million, an increase of 43.3 percent or $17.6 million.

The conference report states:

“The conference agreement includes $58,177,000 as requested and proposed by both the House and the Senate for the global climate change research program. Additional funds for climate change related research are also in other budget activities. The agreement includes $15,000,000 as requested for the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC), including support for a national office, regional hubs, and intra- and extra-mural research. The NCCWSC should oversee and coordinate research on the potential effects of climate change on wildlife, fish, and flora including both terrestrial and aquatic habitats. Locations for the regional centers are to be selected through a collaborative process that engages other Federal, State and Tribal agencies, universities, and other partners. Additional direction concerning the adoption of an integrated approach to climate change science and management is in the front of this statement.”

Science Support:

The FY 2009 appropriation was $67.4 million.
The FY 2010 request was $69.2 million, an increase of $1.8 million or 2.7 percent.

The final bill provides $69.2 million, an increase of $1.8 million or 2.7 percent.

There was no language in the committee report.

Facilities:

The FY 2009 appropriation was $102.1 million.
The FY 2010 request is $106.4 million, an increase of $4.3 million or 4.2 percent.

The final bill provides $106.4 million, an increase of $4.3 million or 4.2 percent.

There was no language in the committee report.

Richard M. Jones
Media and Government Relations Division
American Institute of Physics
rjones@aip.org
301-209-3095