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FYI THIS MONTH: JANUARY 2000

HIGHLIGHTS OF DEVELOPMENTS IN WASHINGTON IMPACTING THE PHYSICS COMMUNITY FROM FYI, THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS BULLETIN OF SCIENCE POLICY NEWS

Richard M. Jones, Audrey T. Leath
fyithismonth@aip.org

CONGRESSMAN DISCUSSES RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONGRESS AND SCIENCE: In a radio interview, physicist and freshman Representative Rush Holt (D-New Jersey) offered his opinions on a number of science funding and policy issues, including balance in the federal research portfolio, science education, and how scientists are seen on Capitol Hill. (FYI #3)

ENERGY SECRETARY SENDS NEW DOE WEAPONS LABS PLAN TO CONGRESS: The "National Nuclear Security Administration Implementation Plan" describes the Clinton Administration's plan for reorganizing the Energy Department's weapons laboratories to comply with a law passed last year. The plan includes a provision to ensure that the weapons labs do not become isolated from other DOE science. (FYI #4)

WHITE HOUSE RELEASES DEFENSE DEPARTMENT STRATEGIC REPORT: The document, "A National Security Strategy for a New Century," sets forth the Defense Department's strategic planning for 21st century challenges, but says relatively little about defense R&D. (FYI #5)

MISMANAGEMENT BLAMED FOR PROBLEMS WITH DOE LASER FACILITY CONSTRUCTION: Two recent reports blamed management deficiencies for cost and schedule overruns at the National Ignition Facility, a critical part of the Energy Department's program to maintain the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile by computerized simulation rather than nuclear testing. (FYI #6)

CLINTON PROPOSES SIGNIFICANT R&D INCREASE IN CAL TECH SPEECH: On January 21, President Clinton announced his plans to request an increase of $2.8 billion for R&D in the FY 2001 budget. Under Clinton's plan, all areas of science and engineering would receive increases, with NSF slated for $675 million in new funding and NIH to receive a $1 billion increase (FYI . #8) Republican Representative James Sensenbrenner of Wisconsin, the chairman of the House Science Committee, reacted with generally positive comments to Clinton's proposal, (FYI #9), while several Clinton Administration science officials provided more details in remarks to reporters aboard Air Force One. (FYI #10)

Want further information? Go to the 2000 archive for "FYI, The American Institute of Physics Bulletin of Science Policy News," and select the issue number cited. This archive, free subscriptions to both of these products, and other science policy and budget information, are available at http://www.aip.org/gov