May 2014 Photos of the Month

By Savannah Gignac, Assistant Photo Librarian

Physicists and their Pets

Schrödinger's cat proves to be the most infamous “pet” of physics.  When it comes to the animal kingdom, physicists have found great friendship from their furry pals.  Our May Photos of the Month feature scientists with their pets.  Dogs, cats, horses, and gerbils can be found running through our collection of scientists and their daily lives outside the workplace.  Make sure not to miss Hubble’s black cat, named Nicolas Copernicus, or Oppenheimer and his horse, Crisis. These and many more images can be found on our website. Please enjoy our featured selection from our historical photos collection of these and other famous pets. To see more images like the ones we’ve selected, type “pets” into the search engine.

Kayser_Heinrich_B1

Description: Heinrich Kayser walking a dog outdoors.

Date: Unknown

Credit: AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives, W. F. Meggers Collection

 

 

 

Crew_Henry_A2

Description: Portrait of Henry Crew at 9 years of age, with his dog, in Richmond, Ohio.

Date: Unknown

Credit: AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives

 

 

 

 

 

Oppenheimer_J_Robert_B19

Description: Robert Oppenheimer with his horse, Crisis, at his New Mexico ranch.

Date: Unknown

Credit: Mrs. J. Robert Oppenheimer, courtesy AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives

 

 

 

Hubble_Edwin_F8

Description: Edwin Powell Hubble seated with his cat Nicolas Copernicus, behind an armillary sphere and next to an orrery.

Date: March, 1953

Credit: Huntington Library, courtesy AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives

 

 

 

 

Barton_Henry_B12

Description: Henry Barton and dog, Telyn, in their yard in Greensboro, Vermont.

Date: 1959

Credit: AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives, Barton Collection

 

 

 

Meggers_William_G20

Description: 'Twelve year old John Meggers (son of William F. Meggers), and two of his favorite friends, guinea pigs born Christmas Eve, are pictured in front of a pile of logs split by his father.' Appeared in the Washington Post Rotogravure Section.

Date: February 23, 1941

Credit: Photo by Joseph S. McCoy, Jr., Washington Post. Contact the Washington Post for information about this photo.