AIP History Center Newsletter
Photos and Quotes included in the
Spring 1999 Issue of the CHP Newsletter

Click directly on the photo to see a larger image and the full caption


George Ellery Hale and Ferdinand Ellerman

George Ellery Hale and Ferdinand Ellerman on Mount Wilson.

Emilio Segre

Emilio Segrč, September 1969.

Fritz Reiche

Fritz Reiche in Berlin, 1912.


The history of everything is now being studied and taught in our universities, —everything, except that which is the bedrock of modern civilization: Science! This is such an absurd lack of proportion that the people of the next generation will not be able to understand it.

—George Sarton


Portable camera obscura drawing

A drawing of a portable camera obscura reproduced from A Treatise on Optics by Sir David Brewster.

Eisenhower

Eisenhower inspecting a capsule retrieved from the Satellite Discoverer XIII, August 1960.


In Science, as in all other departments of inquiry, no thorough grasp of a subject can be gained unless the history of its development is clearly appreciated.

—Archibald Geikie


Fritz Zwicky and Otto Stern

 

Fritz Zwicky and Otto Stern, ca. 1928.

Eugene Rabinowitch

Eugene Rabinowitch, co-founder and editor of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists.


Philosophy students read Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, political-science majors read the U.S. Constitution, and literature classes read Shakespeare, but students of science rarely read the works of Mendeleev or Lavoisier or Einstein... Modern textbooks on science give no sense that scientific ideas come out of the minds of human beings. Instead, science is portrayed as a set of current laws and results, inscribed like the Ten Commandments by some immediate but disembodied authority.

—Alan Lightman


Leo Szilard

Leo Szilard speaking at an early Pugwash conference. Sir Robert Watson-Watt is seated at the left.

Glenn Seaborg

Glenn Seaborg, while Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, inspecting an atomic isotop-powered generator.


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