AIP History Center Newsletter
Volume XXXIV, No. 1 Spring 2002

 

Documentation Preserved
Compiled by Katherine A. Hayes

This is our regular survey of archives and other repositories that gives information on materials of interest to historians and others. Many of these are new deposits not yet processed, but we also include collections that were accessioned years ago but not previously reported here. Some have restricted access. Please contact the repository for further information.

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften. Archiv zur Geschichte der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft. Boltzmannstr. 14, 14195 Berlin, Germany [contact: Marion Kazemi]

Addition to the papers of Heinz Bilz, 1926-. German physicist, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research. Includes biographical documents, correspondence, manuscripts. 1944-1986. .2 meters.

Addition to the papers of Max von Laue, 1879-1960. Major affiliations include: Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Berlin, 1905-1909, 1919-1943; Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München; Universität Frankfurt-am-Main, 1914-1919; Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin, 1951-1960. Nobel Prize for Physics, 1914. Contains letters to his son Theodor in the U.S. with detailed reports including a diary. 1937-1960. 18 folders.

Papers of Ernst-August Müller, 1925-2001. Contains professional papers including his scientific correspondence, research materials and records relating to the Max Planck Institute for Flow Research (Strömungsforschung) and the University of Göttingen where he held the chair for physics, the German Research Foundation, etc. as well as some biographical documents. 1953-2000. 15.6 meters.

Papers of Ernst Ruska, 1906-1988. Physicist. Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society. Nobel prize in physics, 1986. Includes correspondence with colleagues and institutions, honors, research materials especially relating to the electron microscope, for which he won the Nobel Prize in 1986. 1928-1988. 11.75 meters.

Addition to the papers of Walter Gustav Tollmien, 1900-1968. Physicist at Aerodynamischen Versuchsanstalt, 1924-1930, Scientific member of Max-Planck-Institut für Strömungsforschung, 1950-1968. Includes biographical documents, correspondence, research papers, including secret reports of the institute and the Aerodynamische Versuchsanstalt Göttingen from World War II, papers of scientific institutions, among these the Max Planck Society and the Institute, manuscripts, etc. 1933-1969. 2.6 meters.


Russian Academy of Sciences. Archive. Ul. 34 Novocheremushkinskaia, 117218 Moscow, Russia (contact: Archivist)

Scientific and other works, biographical documents, work-related documents of Dmitrii Vladimirovich Skobeltsyn, 1892-1990. Physicist. Pioneer of high-energy physics. The presence of secret subject matter in his research work unquestionably affected the size of the non-secret part of his personal archives. The collection includes articles, autobiographical materials and an autobiography written in 1950, testimonials and character references, information from the P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute (FIAN) of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, information on his many honors and awards, a speech by A. M. Baldin on the scientific and organizational work of Skobeltsyn. The work-related documents include reports on scientific work performed in 1946-1951, 1954, 1958, 1959; correspondence; documents concerning the participation in a symposium on radio electronics, and a conference on nucleon-nucleon and nucleon-pion interactions research; and documents concerning the financing of the first stage of a setup for studying elementary particle interactions at FIAN's high-mountain observatory in Tien-Shan (1958-1969). 1946-2000. 22 items.

Scientific and other works, biographical documents, work-related documents of N. N. (Nikolai Nikolaevich) Bogoliubov, 1909-1992. Fields include theoretical physics, mechanics, and mathematics. Performed research in statistical physics, the quantum theory of fields and elementary particles, and the theory of nonlinear oscillations. Bogoliubov's personal archives includes documents characterizing his life and work, the history of the scientific institutions where he worked, the policies of the Soviet government concerning fundamental science, and the scientific careers of colleagues. The scientific works is an account of the "Quantum theory of fields and its applications," the development of which Bogoliubov directed at the Division of Theoretical Physics at the Mathematics Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences in 1961. Also included are articles and speeches from his tenure as director of the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research in Dubna. They reflect the work performed at the Institute and the author's opinions on international collaboration in the uses of atomic energy for peaceful purposes. Biographical documents include an autobiography (1946), communications concerning the selection of Bogoliubov as director of JINR (1965), and promotion for his candidacy for deputy of the Supreme Soviet of the U.S.S.R. (1966), citations, descriptions of scientific work, recollections of joint work performed with many leading scientists such as: Kolmogorov, Krylov, Logunov, Sobolev, Sisakyan, Shirkov, and others. 1938-2000. 53 items.

Scientific works, biographical documents, work-related documents, correspondence of V. I. (Vitalii Iosifovich) Goldanskii, 1923-2001. Physicist and chemist. Member of Russian Academy of Sciences. The collection includes speeches, testimonials, manuscripts, autobiography, correspondence with foreign and domestic scientists, conference and symposia materials, student exchanges. Most of his work relates to nuclear physics and chemical physics. 1956-1999. 1.5 lin. meters.

Scientific works, biographical documents, work-related documents, correspondence of Bruno Maksimovich Pontekorvo, 1913-1993. Nuclear physicist. Born in Pisa, Pontecorvo studied in Rome; in 1940 he went to the United States, in 1948 to Great Britain, and in 1950 to the Soviet Union. The scientific works include primarily scientific and popular works concerning the significance of research on elementary particles, progress in study of elementary particles, and commemorations of colleagues and recollections. The biographical materials include autobiographical items written throughout 1958-1964, an autobiography (1964), communications regarding awards to Pontekorvo, and his election to full membership in the Soviet Academy of Sciences (1964), testimonials to his work by colleagues, articles, and photographs. Work-related documents include reports by Pontekorvo concerning scientific work performed during the period 1958-1961, correspondence concerning the Nobel Prize for P. L. Kapitsa in 1968, a letter to the Soviet Academy of Sciences concerning financial support for the operation of the Serpukhov elementary-particle accelerator (1969). 1958-2000. 40 items.

Scientific and other works, biographical documents, work-related documents of Dmitrii Vladimirovich Skobeltsyn, 1892-1990. Physicist. Pioneer of high-energy physics. The presence of secret subject matter in his research work unquestionably affected the size of the non-secret part of his personal archives. The collection includes articles, autobiographical materials and an autobiography written in 1950, testimonials and character references, information from the P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute (FIAN) of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, information on his many honors and awards, a speech by A. M. Baldin on the scientific and organizational work of Skobeltsyn. The work-related documents include reports on scientific work performed in 1946-1951, 1954, 1958, 1959; correspondence; documents concerning the participation in a symposium on radio electronics, and a conference on nucleon-nucleon and nucleon-pion interactions research; and documents concerning the financing of the first stage of a setup for studying elementary particle interactions at FIAN’s high-mountain observatory in Tien-Shan (1958-1969). 1946-2000. 22 items.

Scientific works, research materials, biographical documents, correspondence of Yakov Borisovich Zeldovich, 1914-1987. Physicist. Collection includes working notebooks, drafts of scientific papers, lectures and correspondence. Zeldovich's idiosyncratic work style left its mark on his archives and its organization, particularly the notebooks. He recorded his work (calculations, sketches, articles, reports, and lectures) not on individual sheets of paper, but in notebooks. These notebooks contain many subjects, often running together, overlapping, and with no headings or stopping points, few dates, etc. The same subject is often picked up again in a different notebook. The notebooks also contain works written with coauthors and the work of other authors. Collection also includes reprints of Zeldovich's works in Russian and English for 1934-1970; "Collections of Works by Academician Ya. B. Zeldovich," 1973-1976, consisting of 4 volumes compiled in 1989 by B. I. Khlebnikov. The correspondence contains letters from a number of foreign scientists. 1932-1984. Opened for research. 200 items.


American Philosophical Society. Library. 105 South Fifth Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA(contact: Rob Cox)


Papers of Herbert Friedman, 1916-2000. Space scientist. A native of Brooklyn, Friedman went to Brooklyn College (BS, 1936) and Johns Hopkins University (Ph.D., 1940) before accepting a position with the Naval Research Laboratory. Friedman's interests ranged from applied x-ray spectroscopy early in his career to solar physics, upper atmospheric physics and x-ray astronomy. He retired from NRL in 1980, but continued as consultant and emeritus until his death. Correspondence, research notes, lectures, videotapes and photographs pertaining to the career of Herbert Friedman. The bulk of the collection relates to Friedman's later years. Ca. 1950-2000. Ca. 14 lin. ft.

Papers of Walter B. Goad, 1925-2000. Received his doctorate in physics from Duke University in 1954; entered the T-Division at Los Alamos laboratories, taking part in the development of thermonuclear weapons. In the 1960s turned to molecular biology, focusing his quantitative skills on the analysis of nucleic acid sequence data. He was among the founders of GenBank, the first important nucleic acid databank; a pioneer in the emerging field of bioinformatics. Died in Santa Fe, NM. Planning documents, correspondence, working notes, and photographs relating primarily to Goad's burgeoning interest in the quantitative analysis of nucleic acid sequences and the early development of the field of bioinformatics. The bulk of the collection is comprised of materials relating to the founding of GenBank, the nucleic acid sequence clearinghouse, and to human genome data, but there is important information on Goad's defense of his Los Alamos colleague Wen Ho Lee, accused of releasing sensitive information about nuclear weapons research. 1955-2000. 6 lin. ft.


California Institute of Technology. Institute Archives. 1201 East California Blvd. (Mail Code 015A-74), Pasadena, CA 91125, USA (contact: Judith Goodstein or Shelley Erwin)

Oral history interview with Don Lynn Anderson. Geophysicist. Professor of Geophysics at Caltech from 1963. He was the third director of Caltech's Seismological Laboratory. Topics covered include: early life, Caltech career, including history of the Seismological Laboratory, and reminiscences of seismology and geology at Caltech. Interview conducted by Shirley K. Cohen, 2001. Transcript: 83 pp.

Oral history interview with Barry C. Barish, 1936- . Physicist. Worked at California Institute of Technology from 1963. Topics include Barish's life and work at Caltech and other facilities, including his work at various cyclotrons and synchrotrons around the globe. The second half of the interview concentrates on his role as director of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Laboratory. Interview conducted by Shirley K. Cohen in 2001 as part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory Interview Series. Transcript: 66 pp.

Oral history interview with Hans Albrecht Bethe, 1906-. Physicist; Cornell University professor of physics; Nobel laureate. Interview covers Bethe's impressions and reminiscences of numerous well-known Caltech figures including Robert Bacher, Richard Feynman, William Fowler, Theodore von Kármán, Charles Lauritsen, Robert Millikan, Linus Pauling and others. He describes his first impressions of nuclear physics, the political climate in Italy in the 1930s, and the Rome school of physics. The second session focuses on Robert Bacher, Robert Oppenheimer, and Los Alamos. Interview sessions conducted by Judith Goodstein on February 17, 1982 and in 1993. Transcript: 47 pp. (2 sessions).

Oral history interview with Felix Hans Boehm. Professor of Physics, California Institute of Technology, 1958-1995. Interview covers Boehm's personal and professional life. His principal work has been in nuclear structure and the nature and behavior of subatomic particles. Interview conducted by Shirley K. Cohen, 1999. Transcript: 65 pp.

Supplement to papers of Max Delbruck, 1906-1981. Biologist (biophysics) at California Institute of Technology, from 1937. Includes personal correspondence, diaries, lab notebooks (2 from Cold Spring Harbor), and reprints. 3.5 lin. ft.

Microfilm of the papers of Albert Einstein, 1879-1955. Physicist. The collection includes several thousand items of correspondence with scientists (originals, copies, clippings from the published literature), from such figures as Niels Bohr, Erwin Schrödinger, Willem de Sitter, David Hilbert, Moritz Schlick, and Max von Laue, as well as more obscure or controversial people. There are many files of Einstein lecture notes, manuscripts (some unpublished) and pads of his calculations. In addition, there is much correspondence involving many of the major figures of the 20th century on subjects such as literature, music, politics, pacifism, arms control, philosophy, Zionism, the founding of Hebrew University, human rights, etc. In short, the collection is a kaleidoscope of a scientist’s mind and influence, as well as the interactions of the science, politics and culture of the 20th century. Originals located at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Manuscripts and Archives, Jerusalem, Israel.

Oral history interview with Donald V. (Donald Vincent) Helmberger, 1938- . Geophysicist. Professor of Geophysics at Caltech from 1970. He was the fifth director of Caltech’s Seismological Laboratory. Topics covered include: early life, Caltech career, including some history of the Seismological Laboratory, and reminiscences of seismology and geology, and planetary science at Caltech. His research centered on high-frequency modeling of earthquakes to determine details of orientation and rupture processes. Interview conducted by Shirley K. Cohen, 2001. Transcript: 49 pp.

Additions to the manuscript collection of the Palomar Observatory. Small collection of miscellaneous papers relating to Palomar telescope. Collection of original optical shop job record cards and miscellaneous files. 1936-1949.

Oral history interview with Gary H. (Gary Hilton) Sanders, 1946- . Physicist. Topics include Sanders’ education in physics at Columbia and MIT (graduate work under S. C. C. Ting); brief teaching at Princeton; move to Los Alamos in 1978; recruitment to Caltech to work on Laser-Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) team at Caltech in 1994. Involved in high-energy physics research at European and national accelerator laboratories, including DESY, CERN, Brookhaven, Fermilab, and finally Los Alamos. Joined the Laser-Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory team at Caltech in 1994. Interview conducted by Shirley K. Cohen in 2001 as part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory Interview Series. Transcript: 47 pp.

Oral history interview with Alvin Virgil Tollestrup. Interview covers Tollestrup’s early life, education, and career as an experimental physicist. Includes reminiscences of Caltech’s physics division and professors, including R. A. Millikan, W. Smythe, W.A. Fowler, C. C. Lauritsen, M. Gell-Mann, and R. Feynman; also the synchrotron team of R. Langmuir, M. Sands, R. Walker, and B. Rule. Professor of Physics, California Institute of Technology, 1953-1977. Interview conducted by David A. Valone, 1994. Transcript: 49 pp.

Additions to the papers of Fredrik Zachariasen, 1931-1999. Physicist. Professor of Physics, California Institute of Technology from 1965-1999. Includes correspondence, technical notes, course notes, and materials on JASON. The collection is currently unprocessed. Contact repository for information. 8 lin. ft. (8 boxes).


Clark University. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections. University Archives. Goddard Library, 950 Main Street, Worcester, MA 01610-11477, USA (contact: Linn Mott)

Papers of Arthur Gordon Webster, 1863-1923. Physicist (acoustics, mechanics). On the faculty at Harvard University, mathematics (1885-1886); and Clark University, physics, from 1890. Correspondence relating to research on sound vibration and gyroscopes, scientific notation, professional meetings and elections, appointments, travel, speeches, honorary degrees, and publications; includes scientific papers and calculations on mechanics, telegraphy, ballistics, notation, and steam whistles. Correspondents include William E. Alyrton, Joseph G. Coffin, Henry Crew, Samuel P. Langley, Anatole LeBrantz, Hendrik A. Lorentz, William E. Magie, Thomas C. Mendenhall, Ernest Merritt, Henry F. Osborn, Benjamin O. Peirce, Edward B. Rosa, Ernest Rutherford, and Robert S. Woodward. 1892-1920. 0.6 cu. ft.


Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace. Archives. Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA (contact: Elena Danielson)

Papers of Paul J. Flory. American chemist. Correspondence, statements, memoranda, bulletins, press releases, and clippings, relating to the civil rights of dissident scientists in various countries, especially the Soviet Union. Much of the material concerns the cases of Andrei Sakharov, Yuri Orlov and Anatoly Shcharansky. 1975-1986. 7 ms. boxes.


Leo Baeck Institute. Archives Division. 129 East 73rd Street, New York, NY 10021, USA (contact: Frank Mecklenburg)

Additions to the collection of Felix Auerbach, 1856-1933. German physicist, born in Breslau (now Wroclaw, Poland). Auerbach received a doctorate in physics at Heidelberg in 1875, and was named professor of physics at Jena in 1889, where he committed suicide in 1933, together with his wife. Includes sixteen volumes of diaries, 1876-1891, written in Gabelsberger shorthand, dealing with personal, political, and scientific topics; correspondence and personal and family memorabilia; letter by Elizabeth M. Lunau providing biographical information on Felix Auerbach and the fate of his family in the Third Reich; and other personal materials. 1876-1994.

Papers of James Franck, 1882-1964. Physicist, born in Hamburg. Won the Nobel prize in 1925. Died in Göttingen in 1964. Letters; genealogy; obituary. 6 items.

Samuel and Irene Goudsmit Collection. Physicist, born in The Hague in 1902. As a graduate student at the University of Leyden he discovered the electron’s spin together with George E. Uhlenbeck in 1925. He came to the United States in 1927. After World War II it was disclosed that he had been scientific director of ALSOS, the secret wartime operation to learn of the Germans’ development of an atomic bomb. He served as an editor for several influential physical journals. He died in Reno, Nevada. Correspondence regarding Nazi Germany’s nuclear energy and atomic bomb research including seven letters from Goering to members of the Reichsforschungsrat (Dr. Gerlach and Dr. Mentzel), and three letters from Himmler (two addressed to Werner Heisenberg). Addenda to collection include an obituary; documents and correspondence concerning Dr. Curt Dietrich Bejach and his family; document confirming military service in World War I; clippings. 1862-1944. 4 folders.

Collection of Gerhard Herzberg, 1904-1999. Born in Hamburg, Germany, Herzberg studied physics at the Darmstadt Institute of Technology, where he also taught after receiving his doctor’s degree in 1928. Relieved of his position in 1935 by the Nazis, he emigrated to Canada, where he taught at the University of Saskatchewan until 1945. After three years at the University of Chicago, he returned to Canada as head of the Division of Physics at the National Research Council, a position he held until his retirement in 1969. In 1971, he received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in the field of molecular spectroscopy. Clippings on the Nobel Prize; photographs. 1971. 4 items.

Elizabeth Jacob family papers. Family history documenting the emigration of Hermann Jakob, Pauline Hermann. Miscellaneous materials relating to Max Jakob, his wife Anna, and his children Elizabeth and Karl; various documents relating to the work of Max Jakob (1879-1955) as physicist including laudatios, official diplomas, lectures; copies of correspondence between Max Jakob and Albert Einstein as well as Max Planck; family trees; family correspondence and official correspondence relating to the emigration of Pauline and Hermann Jakob to Chicago from Ludwigshafen.

We Kept Our Heads by Dodo Liebman, 1906-1976. Born in Berlin; studied physics and completed a Ph.D. degree shortly after Hitler came to power. Married Gert Liebman in 1936, shortly before their emigration to England. Story of upbringing in Berlin Jewish middle-class family; primary and secondary education; university studies at Berlin and Heidelberg; member of Communist party in 1933; Ph.D. in 1934; work in factories; emigration to England in 1936; internment on Isle of Man during World War II; death of husband in 1956; compensation from Germany. 1976. 111 pp.

Memoirs of Dan Porat, 1922-1996. Physicist, born in Stanislawow; youth growing up in Poland, moving to Vienna; anti-Semitism in Europe; Anschluss and emigration to Palestine in 1939; volunteers as engineer with British army, fighting in Africa and Italy. Family life; victim of Arab terrorist attacks. Post-war studies in physics at Manchester University in England; and moves to the U.S. to work as a nuclear physicist at Harvard and MIT. Works as physicist at Stanford for 26 years. 23 pp.

Collection of Otto Stern, 1888-1967. Physicist. Photographs; biographical notes. 3 items.

Siegfried Czapski, 1861-1907 Collection, compiled by Friedrich Stier. Physicist (optics); since 1905 director of Zeiss. Photos of Czapski and family; genealogy of his family. Manuscript by Friedrich Stier on his life, Siegried Czapski, undated; in German, 26 pp; typed, photocopied. Biographical essay on the physicist who worked many years in the Zeiss optical establishment in Jena; focuses on his long collaboration with Ernst Abbe. 1861-1907. 1 folder.


Library of Congress. Manuscript Division. James Madison Memorial Building, First Street and Independence Avenue, S. E., Washington, DC 20540, USA (contact: Leonard Bruno)

Papers of Philip Hauge Abelson. Scientist and editor. Abelson spent most of his career at the Carnegie Institution, moving from assistant physicist (1939) to director of the Geophysical Lab to president (1971-1978). Correspondence, writings, reports, speeches, lectures, subject files, biographical material, appointment file, printed material, awards, photographs, and other papers on Abelson’s work in nuclear physics and other scientific fields. 1939-2000. Unprocessed. Ca. 12,000 items.

Papers of Vera C. Rubin, 1928- . Astronomer. Correspondence, writings, speeches, subject files, research material, printed material, charts, graphs, photographs, and other papers primarily on Rubin’s work as an astronomer. 1952-1993. Ca. 17,000 items.

Additions to papers of Charles H. Townes. Physicist at the University of California, Berkeley. Designed the first maser and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1964. Writings, research notes, chronological files, student papers, audio and video recordings, and other papers. 1939-1992. Unprocessed. Ca. 11,000 items.

Addition to papers of John Von Neumann, 1903-1957. Mathematician, atomic energy commissioner, educator, and consultant. Correspondence, report, and clippings pertaining primarily to the problem concerning the Poiseuille-type laminar flow. 10 items.


Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Archives and History Office. 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS 82, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA (contact: Jean Deken)

Papers of Joseph Ballam, 1917-1997. Ballam received his BS in physics from the University of Michigan in 1939. After one semester at MIT, he joined the war effort at the U.S. Navy’s Bureau of Ships. Received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, 1951 for studies on cosmic rays. Was Assistant Professor at Princeton; Senior Faculty at Michigan State University; in 1961 joined SLAC as an Associate Professor; was Associate Director of the SLAC Research Division 1963-1982. Correspondence, photographic slides, publications, reports, realia. Records dealing with SLAC’s Positron Electron Project (PEP), Hydrogen Bubble Chamber (HBC) Program, and Experimental Program Advisory Committee (EPAC); as well as SLAC Collaborations, TACUP (Technical Advisory Committee & University Programs), and the U.S. High-Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). 1972-1996. Papers are unprocessed. Collection number 00-069. Please contact the SLAC Archivist for more information regarding access. 17 cu. ft.

Papers of Richard E. Taylor, 1929- . B.Sc. 1950; M.Sc. 1952, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Ph.D. 1962, Stanford University. Physicist, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California, 1961-1962. Experimental Physicist, SLAC, Stanford, 1962-1968. Associate Professor and Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1968-present. Associate Director, Research Division, SLAC, Stanford, 1982-1986. Nobel Prize in Physics, 1990. Research areas: Experimental particle physics, electron scattering; engaged in the H1 experiment at the HERA electron-positron collider in Hamburg, Germany; gravitational wave research and space-based studies of x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy. Correspondence, publications, reports, logbooks, photographs, presentations, videotapes. Subjects include the design and construction of SLAC End Station A (ESA), Beam Switchyard and spectrometers, as well as development of SLAC Group A experiments. Lab books and experimental data for multiple projects including documentation on Elastic and Inelastic Scattering research performed at ESA, including part of the experimental program which resulted in the 1990 Nobel Prize. Records on the organization of the Lepton Photon Symposium held at SLAC August 1989. Records of the Superconducting Super Collider Site Committee. Correspondence and Reports of the KAON (Kaon, Antiproton, Other hadron and Neutrino) Factory in Vancouver, Canada. 1964-1992. Papers are unprocessed. Please contact the SLAC Archivist for more information regarding access. 43 cu. ft.


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