House Science Committee

The importance of international scientific partnerships dominated a speech by House Science Committee Chairman James Sensenbrenner (R-WI) on June 11 to the U.S.-Korea Science Policy Forum. Portions of his address, touching on international cooperation, the SSC, LHC, ITER, space station, and science budget and policy formulation, follow:

17 Jun 1998

House Science Committee Vice Chairman Vern Ehlers (R-MI) wrapped up the hearings phase of his National Science Policy Study on June 10, with the seventh and final hearing. Ehlers expects next month to have completed a draft of a "new, sensible, coherent long-range science and technology policy." Previous hearings have covered how to improve K-12 science education and graduate education, government-academia-industry scientific partnerships and international collaborations, the federal role in funding basic research, and communicating science to the public.

16 Jun 1998

The House Science Committee held a 2 1/2 hour hearing last week to get an update on the International Space Station (ISS). As expected, committee members did not like what they heard, and, probably, the witnesses did not like what they had to report. Nevertheless, at the end of the day, the outlook suggests no major change in course -- at least, not yet.

12 May 1998

House Science Committee Chairman James Sensenbrenner (R-WI) is not a happy man -- in his words, he is frustrated. The source of his frustration is the International Space Station, as explained in an April 23, 1998 address to the Space Transportation Association. Selections from his lengthy speech follow:

29 Apr 1998

The Science Committee is the authorizing committee on the House side for most of the federal government's civilian science and technology policies and programs, particularly those related to physics. Its counterpart in the Senate is the Commerce Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space (see FYI #68.) Agencies under the House Science Committee's jurisdiction in the 105th Congress include the National Science Foundation, NASA, NIST, and the Department of Energy's non-military R&D programs.

17 Apr 1998

The Science Committee is the authorizing committee on the House side for most of the federal government's civilian science and technology policies and programs, particularly those related to physics. Its counterpart in the Senate is the Commerce Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space (see FYI #68.) Agencies under the House Science Committee's jurisdiction in the 105th Congress include the National Science Foundaiton, NASA, NIST, and the Department of Energy's non-military R&D programs.

17 Apr 1998

On March 25, the House Science Committee took a second look at scientific collaborations. A March 11 hearing (see FYI #45) had examined research partnerships to provide input for the National Science Policy Study being chaired by Rep. Vern Ehlers (R-MI). Ehlers returned to the topic in a March 25 hearing reviewing the benefits to the U.S. from international scientific cooperation. The witnesses agreed that because of constrained science funding in the U.S.

2 Apr 1998

House Science Committee Chairman James Sensenbrenner (R-WI) gave a speech last week to a university association during which he offered his plain-spoken views on the following:

9 Mar 1998

As reported in FYI #13, yesterday House Science Committee Chairman James Sensenbrenner (R-WI), spoke at the annual meeting of the Universities Research Associates (URA) Council of Presidents. This FYI contains his remarks on specific issues that the Science Committee will address this year, including the Kyoto Global Warming Treaty, funding for the Next Generation Internet, construction of a National Spallation Neutron Source, and U.S. participation in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe.

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30 Jan 1998

Below are highlights from remarks by House Science Committee Chairman James Sensenbrenner (R-WI), delivered yesterday at the annual meeting of the Universities Research Associates (URA) Council of Presidents. Notably, Sensenbrenner criticizes both the science initiatives in President Clinton's State of the Union Address and a recent Senate bill to authorize an increase in science funding (S. 1305; see FYI #133, 1997) for lacking coherence and credible justification.

30 Jan 1998

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