Senate Commerce, Science, Transportation Committee

Appropriators are some of the most powerful Members of Congress
because they control the purse strings of federal programs.  In the
104th Congress, Senator Phil Gramm of Texas chairs the Senate
Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, State, and
Judiciary.  This subcommittee funds, among other programs, the
Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and
Technology.  Gramm replaces Senator Ernest Hollings of South
Carolina as subcommittee chairman.

Subcommittee Roster:

2 Nov 1995

Among Senate authorizing committees, one of the most important to
the science community is the Subcommittee on Science, Technology,
and Space of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation
Committee.  Authorizing committees can approve, but not provide
funds for, programs under their jurisdiction.  Under Senator Jay
Rockefeller (D-WV) and, prior to that, under then-Senator Al Gore
(D-TN), the subcommittee considered numerous science and technology
issues, including research on global warming, the space program,

31 Jan 1995

On December 10, the Commerce Department's Under Secretary for Technology, Mary
Good, spoke before an appreciative audience at a University of Maryland
Physics Department colloquium.  Speaking from a wealth of experience in all
three sectors, Good addressed how government, industry and academia in the
U.S. should prepare to meet the technological challenges of the next century.
This country has "everything we need" to lead in the twenty-first century, she
announced: "It is ours to lose."

20 Dec 1996

When the 105th Congress convenes on January 7, a number of key
representatives who have played significant roles in the
formulation of science policy and funding will not be returning.
Five will be retiring; others lost their re-election bid.  Here is
what we know, and do not yet know:

APPROPRIATIONS

Energy and Water Development:

Retiring - Chairman John Myers (R-IN), Ranking Member Tom Bevill
(D-AL),  Jim Chapman (D-TX; defeated in Senate primary race)

Defeated - ?

8 Nov 1996

When the 105th Congress convenes on January 7, three key senators
who have played significant roles in the formulation of science
policy and funding will not be returning.  Two are retiring; one
lost his re-election bid.  Here is what we now know:

APPROPRIATIONS

Energy and Water Development:

Retiring - Ranking Member J. Bennett Johnston (D-LA), Mark
Hatfield (R-OR)

Defeated - (None)

VA, HUD, and Independent Agencies:

Retiring - J. Bennett Johnston (D-LA)

Defeated - (None)

6 Nov 1996

In the Senate, most authorizing legislation for physics-related
programs is drafted in the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and
Space.  It is a subcommittee of the Commerce, Science, and
Transportation Committee.  While in the Senate, this subcommittee
has jurisdiction over most of the federal civilian science and
technology programs, its counterpart in the House is a full
committee, the Science Committee.  The House Science Committee has
four separate subcommittees to oversee different areas of science
and technology (see FYIs #25, 26.)

23 Feb 1996

In the Senate, most authorizing legislation for physics-related programs is drafted by the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space of the Senate Commerce Committee. While in the Senate, this subcommittee has jurisdiction over most of the federal civilian science and technology programs, its counterpart in the House is a full committee, the Science Committee. The House Science Committee has four separate subcommittees to oversee different areas of science and technology, which will be described in future FYIs.

14 Mar 1997

The Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, State and Judiciary is responsible for writing an appropriations bill that funds, among other agencies, the Department of Commerce. Within the Commerce Department are the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA.) Below is the roster for this subcommittee for the 105th session of Congress. Included with each subcommittee member's name is a web site. Information on rosters comes from the Congressional Quarterly's Washington Alert.

3 Feb 1997

 NOMINATIONS: The Senate Commerce Committee on July 9 voted to recommend Senate confirmation of Neal Lane as Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy. (The committee also approved the nomination of Rosina Bierbaum to be an OSTP Associate Director.) The Senate has already confirmed Rita Colwell to be Lane's successor as Director of NSF, but it is not certain that Lane's confirmation will take place this year so that he can move on to OSTP and make room for Colwell at NSF.

22 Jul 1998

In the Senate, most authorizing legislation for physics-related programs is drafted by the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space of the Senate Commerce Committee. While in the Senate, this subcommittee has jurisdiction over most of the federal civilian science and technology programs, its counterpart in the House is a full committee, the Science Committee. The House Science Committee has four separate subcommittees to oversee different areas of science and technology, which will be described in future FYIs.

17 Apr 1998

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