Energy

Beginning as early as today, and continuing through the remainder
of the week, the Senate will consider H.R. 4506, the Energy and
Water Development Appropriations Bill for FY 1995.  Accompanying
this Senate version of the bill (passed earlier this month by the
House) is a committee report.  While not having the force of law,
these recommendations are the basis for later negotiations with the
House Appropriations Committee to resolve differences between the
two versions of the bill.  Selections from the Senate committee

29 Jun 1994

On June 14 the House of Representatives passed the Energy and Water
Development Appropriations bill for fiscal year 1995.  Science
funding within the Department of Energy survived unchanged from the
amounts recommended by the House Appropriations Committee (see FYIs
#74-77 for details on the committee's report). 

22 Jun 1994

On June 14, the House Subcommittee on Science held its second
hearing on the future of the U.S. high energy physics program.
Testimony centered on the report, "High Energy Physics Advisory
Panel's Subpanel on Vision for the Future of High-Energy Physics."
As was true at the May 23 hearing, reactions to the Drell subpanel
report were positive and enthusiastic.

17 Jun 1994

As reported in FYI #84, House science committee chairman George
Brown (D-California) has introduced a bill authorizing the
Department of Energy's Fusion Energy Program through fiscal year
1997.  (As an authorizing, rather than appropriating, committee,
the House science committee can only approve programs and recommend
funding, but cannot provide funds.) 

16 Jun 1994

"If we want to pursue the potential of fusion, we need to
understand that it will be largely at government expense, and it is
likely to require a sustained investment for decades to come."  --
Rep. George Brown

16 Jun 1994

A major conclusion of the report, "High Energy Physics Advisory
Panel's Subpanel on Vision for the Future of High-Energy Physics,"
is that the United States "must collaborate in research that will
explore promising new territory on the energy frontier, using
accelerators and detectors either within the United States or
abroad.  At this time, that implies joining with the European
Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) at the Large Hadron Collider
(LHC)."

9 Jun 1994

The new report, "High Energy Physics Advisory Panel's Subpanel on
Vision for the Future of High-Energy Physics," (see FYIs #72 and
#73) reviews federal funding for high energy physics research.  The
subpanel found that the program "is severely strained and badly out
of balance as it enters FY 1995."  The real buying power of the DOE
high energy physics program's operating and equipment budgets for
FY 1995 declined by approximately 20% when compared to FY 1990.
Planned upgrades of existing accelerators and 15 new

9 Jun 1994

This and future issues of FYI will cover the recently released
report, "High Energy Physics Advisory Panel's Subpanel on Vision
for the Future of High-Energy Physics."  The following are the
recommendations from the report's Executive Summary (please note
clarification in Recommendation 5):

26 May 1994

First reactions on Capitol Hill to an eagerly-awaited report on
high energy physics research were very positive.  Both friend and
foe of the now-canceled SSC were effusive in their praise for the
draft report, "High Energy Physics Advisory Panel's Subpanel on
Vision for the Future of High-Energy Physics."

25 May 1994

The Department of Energy's fusion energy research program was the
subject of an afternoon hearing before the House Subcommittee on
Energy on April 21, 1994.  The hearing was billed as an opportunity
for the subcommittee to receive testimony from, as subcommittee
chair Marilyn Lloyd (D-TN) said, those who were not largely the
"traditional insiders."  Aside from Rep. Dick Swett (D-NH), who
chaired the hearing, it attracted little Member interest.

28 Apr 1994

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