R&D

Both the House and Senate Armed Services Committees have recommended no research funding for a Stimulated Isomer Energy Release (SIER) that could, some researchers predict, lead to the development of a new weapon. The Bush Administration requested $4.0 million in FY 2005 funding for SIER in the DARPA budget.

This program was described in the FY 2005 RDT&E DARPA budget estimates document as follows:

4 Jun 2004

Two years ago, the National Research Council (NRC) laid out 11 key scientific questions at the intersection of physics and astronomy in a report entitled "Connecting Quarks to the Cosmos" (see FYIs #67 and #68, 2002). Earlier this year, in response, an interagency working group of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) released a prioritized strategic plan for efforts across several government agencies to address those 11 questions.

14 Jun 2004

Although brief in length, a recent report by the Science and Technology Policy Institute for the National Science Foundation raises important questions that will be long discussed about the conduct of university-based R&D in the United States. "Vital Assets: Federal Investment in Research and Development at the Nation's Universities and Colleges" is the first truly comprehensive data analysis of federal R&D spending at America's institutions of higher learning.

9 Jun 2004

"We are committed to working with the federal government to construct a visa system that protects the nation from terrorists while enhancing our nation's security not only by barring inappropriate visitors but also by enabling the brightest and most qualified international students, scholars, and scientists to participate fully in the U.S. higher education and research enterprises." -- Statement and Recommendations on Visa Problems Harming America's Scientific, Economic, and Security Interests

9 Jun 2004

Two House members recently proposed an amendment to create an independent commission to study charges that the Bush Administration has politicized scientific advice. The amendment to H.R. 2432, the Paperwork and Regulatory Improvements Act, introduced by Reps. Henry Waxman (D-CA) and John Tierney (D-MA), was rejected by a vote of 201-226 on May 18. Most members voted along party lines, with one Republican voting for the amendment and five Democrats voting against it.

7 Jun 2004

On a largely party line vote, the House of Representatives rejected an amendment to remove the spending authorization for research next year on the Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator (RNEP). The 204 "yes" to 214 "no" vote on Rep. Ellen Tauscher's (D-CA) amendment to the FY 2005 Defense Authorization bill sets the stage for Senate consideration of a companion bill in the coming weeks, as well as the FY 2005 Energy and Water Development Appropriations bill.

2 Jun 2004

"Now, more than ever, American science must enlighten American statecraft." - Secretary of State Colin Powell

A new program will help the State Department tap into the scientific expertise of senior faculty at the nation's universities, while a National Academies committee is seeking ways to ensure that the best-qualified candidates are appointed to scientific posts within the federal government and on federal advisory committees.

JEFFERSON FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM:

1 Jun 2004

Based on allegations that officials in the Bush Administration have, for political and ideological reasons, manipulated scientific advisory committees, reports, and information, several Democratic Members of Congress asked the General Accounting Office (GAO) to review the federal government's policies for staffing scientific advisory committees. At a May 19 briefing, Reps.

20 May 2004

Based on allegations that officials in the Bush Administration have, for political and ideological reasons, manipulated scientific advisory committees, reports, and information, several Democratic Members of Congress asked the General Accounting Office (GAO) to review the federal government's policies for staffing scientific advisory committees. At a May 19 briefing, Reps.

20 May 2004

We are living in "an entirely new world economy" and we are "not going to go back to the way it was," said Denis Fred Simon of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in an April 26 presentation. The new economy will be "increasingly dominated by countries other than the U.S.," he warned. Simon was one of six speakers addressing various aspects of economic globalization and the offshoring of jobs at the 29th Annual AAAS Science and Technology Policy Forum.

4 May 2004

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