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American Institute of Physics

 

 


April-May 2004
Volume 10, Issue 2

Features

John Woollam’s career in ellipsometry
When John Woollam, a physics professor in charge of the ellipsometry program at the University of Nebraska--Lincoln, founded his own company in 1987, this was an unusual event. Since then, J. A. Woollam Co., Inc., has grown into a worldwide leader in its field, with more than 40 patents and 35 employees.

Finding pollution with aerial infrared thermography
Liquids polluting streams can be pinpointed from the air using aerial infrared thermography because of the temperature difference between the two liquids. This is an efficient and effective method compared to time-consuming and labor-intensive traditional ground-based methods.

How IBM sustains the leading edge
AIBM has a history, over more than a century, of getting new ideas into the marketplace—devices that process, store, and communicate information. Its scientists and engineers continue to pioneer discoveries in such fields as optics, quantum information processing, and natural patterning.

What is rheology anyway?
Rheology studies the flow of unusual materials, particularly non-Newtonian fluids such as mayonnaise, paint, molten plastics, and foams. The Society of Rheology, whose Greek motto means “everything flows,” caters to rheologists in many fields.

News

Briefs: Inverse Doppler effect; DNA-guided nanotubes; Magnetic graphite; Butterfly blues

Departments

Book Reviews

Book List

Letters

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