Reports, reviews, and assessments

26 Mar 1993

"Trends in the Structure of Federal Science Support" is a report
released last December by a working group of the Federal
Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology
(FCCSET).  The report, which runs over 100 pages, provides an
in-depth examination of the federal government's support for
science during the decade of the 1980's.  It is free, but available
only in limited supply.  Readers interested in obtaining a copy
should call the FCCSET office at 202-395-5101 for information on

5 Mar 1993

The General Accounting Office has released a report that opponents
of the Superconducting Super Collider will be citing for the rest
of the year.  In repeated criticisms about accounting practices,
schedule and cost overruns, and possible downsizing of the
detectors, the GAO paints what can only be described as a sobering
future for the project.  Although DOE takes strong issue with GAO
(see FYI #28), this new report will make the annual task of
securing an appropriation for the facility all the more difficult.

25 Feb 1993

On February 22, the Clinton Administration released a report,
"Technology for America's Economic Growth, A New Direction to Build
Economic Strength."  Among the highlights of this 36-page report
summarizing the administration's approach to science and technology
are:

24 Feb 1993

A new report by the General Accounting Office, "Foreign
Contributions to the SSC," cautions that "DOE may have difficulty
obtaining the foreign contributions needed to meet its $1.7 billion
goal for the SSC."  This 15-page study, done at the request of a
House science subcommittee, also found "the procedures DOE and the
SSC Laboratory followed when entering into agreements with foreign
laboratories and the criteria DOE used for considering cost savings
under international agreements as foreign contributions were
appropriate." 

10 Feb 1993

The National Science Foundation has released a 84-page report
entitled "National Patterns of R&D Resources: 1992" providing
important data on selected R&D trends.  A product of the Division
of Science Resources Studies, this document is the latest in a
series of NSF reports monitoring science and technology spending.

Highlights of the report's major findings (some of which are
approximations/estimations/expectations) follow.  All are adjusted
for inflation:

29 Jan 1993

The 103 Congress is now underway.  As future FYIs report on and
analyze congressional actions throughout the year, the following
list of congressional terminology might be of use to readers:

15 Jan 1993

"...I have had the opportunity to work on a wide range of issues as
the Assistant to President Bush for Science and Technology, but
none has been more important to me than those issues involving the
health of this nation's research-intensive universities."
                                           - D. Allan Bromley

7 Jan 1993

Trying to characterize science policy developments in physics and
astronomy in 1992 is difficult at best.  Some projects continued to
receive significant budget increases while other facilities were
closed.  Department and agency budgets had uneven growth.  Despite
the ups and downs in federal funding, new attention was given to
scientific advances as a key component of a national economic
strategy.  Here are some of the major physics and astronomy policy
developments in 1992:

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION:

5 Jan 1993

At noon today the first session of the 103rd Congress convened.
This will be a dynamic year in Washington, with significant changes
on both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue.  Much of what occurs during
these next twelve months will have profound implications for the
physics and astronomy community.

2 Dec 1994

Setting milestones and measuring achievement are Clinton
Administration watchwords for science and technology policy.  A
recent example is a September 1994 progress report on the National
Information Infrastructure (NII), issued by Commerce Secretary Ron
Brown, who chairs the interagency Information Infrastructure Task
Force (IITF).  The NII is a favorite project of Vice President
Gore, who says in the report's preface, "This seamless web of
communications networks including computers, televisions,

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