United States. Air Force. Office of Scientific Research

Interviewed by
David Zierler
Interview date
Location
Video conference
Abstract

Interview with Demetrius Venable, Professor Emeritus at Howard University. Venable discusses the administrative distinctions between physics and astronomy at Howard, and he surveys some of the most interest projects currently in train at NASA. He recounts his upbringing in segregated small-town Virginia, the educational limitations this imposed, and his service in ROTC at Virginia State University. He discusses a formative intensive summer program at Columbia, and he describes the opportunities that led to his graduate admission at American University to work with Richard Kay on the effectiveness of circular polarization versus linear polarization in excited states in solid material. Venable describes his postdoctoral research at IBM, then taking a faculty position at St. Paul’s College, before taking a longer-term position at Hampton Institute. He discusses his early involvement with NASA’s remote sensing program, he describes his tenure as director of the dual degree engineering program and the collaborative opportunities he was able to pursue with Jefferson Lab. Venable recounts his increasing administrative responsibilities leading to becoming Provost at Hampton, and he discusses the growth of the NASA-supported Center for Optical Physics. He explains his decision to move to Howard, where he could be more fully involved in research for CSTEA and the LiDAR system, and his partnership with NOAA on climate modeling. Venable conveys his enjoyment at receiving NASA’s Distinguished Public Service Medal, and he provides historical perspective on current and past calls to make STEM more diverse and inclusive. At the end of the interview, Venable explains his deep interest in physics education, and he expresses optimism in the long-term strength of Howard’s physics program.

Interviewed by
Gary Cameron
Interview date
Location
Gaseous Electronics Conference
Abstract

In this interview Leon Fisher and Robert Varney discuss topics such as: Leonard Loeb; Willliam Allis; Sandy Brown; New York University; Wayne Nottingham; Julius Molnar; Phillip Morse; people from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Bell Laboratories; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Norris Bradbury; Dan Alpert; Gerhard Weissler; Lockheed Corporation; John A. Hornbeck; Ben Bederson; Homer Hagstrum; microwaves; radar development; T. D. Lee; Alfred Von Engel; Army Research Office; Office of Naval Research; Air Force Office of Scientific Research; ionized gases; Ted Holstein; cosmic rays; neutrons; Lester Germer; Ronald Geballe; gas discharges; American Physical Society; Karl Darrow; William Shockley.

Interviewed by
Charles Weiner
Interview date
Location
Whitman College, Walla Walla, Washington
Abstract

Early experiences in science at Whitman College, Washington, from 1920; friendships with fellow students and teachers. Graduate study at University of Oregon and Harvard University; difficulties funding education; study with Edward A. Milne at Oregon and John Van Vleck at Harvard. Work at National Bureau of Standards on piezoelectricity and oscillators; work at Bell Labs on thermionic emission and experimental basis of statistical mechanics; influence of Arnold Sommerfeld on his work on the copper oxide rectifier. World War II work with National Defense Research Council on the magnetic head of submarine detectors. Return to Bell Labs following World War II; research in solid state with group headed by William Shockley and Stanley O. Morgan; preliminary researches in semiconductor effects.

Interviewed by
Alan Holden and W. James King
Interview dates
June 1964
Location
Bell Telephone Laboratories
Abstract

Early experiences in science at Whitman College, Washington, from 1920; friendships with fellow students and teachers. Graduate study at University of Oregon and Harvard University; difficulties funding education; study with Edward A. Milne at Oregon and John Van Vleck at Harvard. Work at National Bureau of Standards on piezoelectricity and oscillators; work at Bell Labs on thermionic emission and experimental basis of statistical mechanics; influence of Arnold Sommerfeld on his work on the copper oxide rectifier. World War II work with National Defense Research Council on the magnetic head of submarine detectors. Return to Bell Labs following World War II; research in solid state with group headed by William Shockley and Stanley O. Morgan; preliminary researches in semiconductor effects.

Interviewed by
Joan Bromberg
Interview date
Location
New Haven, Connecticut
Abstract

In this interview, William R. Bennett discusses his work with lasers. Topics discussed include: helium neon laser; Ali Javan; Donald Herriott; Columbia University; Yale University; Air Reduction Company (Airco); Linde Air Products Company; Hugh Robinson; Lewis B. Headrick; Ora S. Duffendack; Bell Labs; Harrie Stewart Wilson Massey; Eric Henry Stoneley Burhop; Allan C. G. Mitchell; Mark W. Zemansky; Rudolf Walter Ladenburg; Sidney Millman; Technical Measurement Corporation; Ted Geballe; Conyers Herring; A. L. Schawlow; Henry Scovil; Harry Nyquist; Jim Gordon; Gardner Fox; Tingye Li; E. I. Gordon; G. D. Boyd; A. F. Turner; Bausch & Lomb Laboratories; Technical Research Group (TRG); Gordon Gould; Charlie Townes; Theodore Maiman; Deming Lewis; A. T. Forrester; George Dacey; C. Geoffrey B. Garrett; Ross McFarlane; Bruce Bogert; Willis Lamb; Paul Rabinowitz; V. P. Chebotaev; John. W. Knutson; Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR); Army Research Office, Durham (AROD); Vernon Hughes; Lloyd Wood; Marshall Harrington; Alfred P. Sloane Foundation; Institute for Defense Analyses; Bob Collins; Kurt Shuler; Walter Faust; argon laser; Spectra Physics; Bill Bridges; Grant Fowles; William Silfvast; Bill Walter; Marty Pilch.