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The Life of R. W. Wood

“A genius.” “Very undisciplined.” “A beautiful craftsman.” “An aristocrat.” “My hero.”

Robert Williams Wood, often known simply as R. W. Wood, was many things to many people. A physicist, science fiction author, poet, and (it seems to me) a man who lived for drama, Wood spent most of his career in the physics department at Johns Hopkins University. In honor of National Poetry Month I want to take a dive into Wood’s life and his eclectic career.


Wood the Physicist

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A Quantum Introduction for World Quantum Day

To celebrate 4.14, World Quantum Day, we'll learn about quantum physics from the experts that shaped the field (with special help from classic films like Mean Girls and When Harry Met Sally).

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April POTM

In honor of National Library Week, today we are celebrating the role of libraries and librarians!
The theme for National Library Week 2022, “Connect with Your Library,” promotes the idea that libraries are places to get connected to technology by using broadband, computers, and other resources. Libraries also offer opportunities to connect with media, programs, ideas, and classes—in addition to books. Most importantly libraries also connect communities to each other. Overall, the theme is an explicit call to action—an invitation for communities to join, visit, or advocate for their local libraries.

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March Photos of the Month

Inspired by the book America Is Immigrants by Sara Nović and illustrated by Alison Kolesar, we bring you this month’s Photos of the Month: a sampling of physicists and physics-adjacent people who immigrated to America. Interspersed throughout photographs from our Emilio Segrè Visual Archives are some excerpts and illustrations from the book.

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It's Women's History Month and all of us here at the Niels Bohr Library & Archives love podcasts. We recently compiled our favorite podcast episodes featuring women in science in a tweet thread and thought we would share it with our Ex Libris Universum readers! Here are our podcast recommendations for your enjoyment.

Note: It may take a few seconds for tweets to load.

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The new underground vault at the American Institute of Physics is ready to become home for the Wenner Collection, other rare books, manuscripts, and archival photographs that are part of the Niels Bohr Library & Archives collections. The space was redesigned and upgraded with the financing from designated AIP funds and a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

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You can now find all of the digitized images from our Emilio Segrè Visual Archives in the Niels Bohr Library & Archives digital collections site! We are excited to now have a central repository for our digitized collection materials, but realize that this is a big change for researchers, so our staff compiled a handy guide you can use to get acquainted with the features of the new site.

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Some of the coolest virtual museums on the Internet

Please let me be your tour guide on this trip of my own 10101010 explorations. Some of these came from recommendations from colleagues, some are from institutions AIP has a relationship with, and some of them were found through Internet rabbit holes. You’ll see that the formats vary widely; some are very sleek and modern-looking while others are more modest in form, but all of them have fascinating content. Most, but not all, are about history of science topics. Did I miss any of your favorites? Let us know in the comments below or tag us in a Tweet!

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Happy Black History Month! We are excited to share some of our favorite books by and/or about Black scientists and science fiction protagonists. Our list spans multiple genres, so there is a book for everyone to enjoy!

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Uncovering Eunice Newton Foote

I wrote “Eunice Newton Foote’s Nearly Forgotten Discovery” this past summer as an intern for the Center for History of Physics and Niels Bohr Library & Archives. This article ended up being the most shared article on the Physics Today website in 2021! Today is the anniversary of Raymond Sorenson’s article that brought her work to light in 2011, so in celebration, I’m revisiting my own article to give readers a behind the scenes look.